Meditation Resources

On the prison library listserve, this mediation resource was shared. It is one that I’ve bookmarked, so I thought I’d share it as well. (To subscribe to the listserve, visit this website.)

Loyola University Maryland has the Bridge Project that’s mission is on the power of meditation. The project states that:

In prison the body is confined. The spirit and soul need not be. Thousands of inmates around the country are using their confinement to trigger an inward journey. They are traveling to a place of greater joy, peace, and freedom. You are invited to join in!

You might also be able to find or start a contemplative group in your institution. This is an inward journey but it sure helps to have companions.

To assist, we have included some inmate letters and an extensive resource list for those seeking information, help, and support in developing a meditative practice. Don’t hesitate to contact one or more of these groups.

Remember, as you embark on your journey, that love and energy surrounds you!

They offer resources via a website or a pdf that provides a list of organizations, what they have to offer people behind bars, and how to contact them. (FYI: The websites listed on their resource page do not work, but if you copy & paste the urls, they work just fine.)

Their resource website also links to a documentary called The Dhamma Brothers which is free to watch on Hulu. Below is a preview.

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Hot Topics Dialogues: Incarcerated Sisters

Last week I had the opportunity to be on a panel for the Hot Topics Dialogues series focusing on issues women face in prison.

We discussed why women are incarcerated & what women were disproportionately behind bars, what dangers / risks women faced, women & family relations, programming  for women in prison, challenges women face, etc.

I was able to share what prison librarianship means behind bars, what the jail libraries look like for women in our local county jails, what women read, censorship, programs libraries offer, urban fiction, etc.

Below are some resources that were suggested at the panel:

Web Sources:

Print Sources:

Kind words for Exploring Prison Librarianship & a Great Youth Services Resource

This weekend I had a very nice surprise… stumbling on these kind words for my blog’s Urban Fiction Resources page!

The sweet librarian that said such nice things has a great website called Library Services for Incarcerated Youth. I don’t really mention youth services much. This website will be a great source for all of us!

Library Services for Incarcerated Youth features five key resources for you: getting started, funding, successful projects, evaluation, and resources. Check it out!

L is for Listservs. R is for Resources.

The ALA prison library listerv is full of resources and support.

You can join the Listserv, prison-l, here: http://lists.ala.org/wws/info/prison-l.

Recently a conversation took place after a question was posed on wanting to learn about prison libraries.

Below are the recommended sources:

(Image credit)

New Section in the Reading List

A new section was added to the “Reading List” tab to reflect journals that have specific issues released that focus on prison librarianship or the PIC.

Resources are listed by publication date.

This section is located at the bottom of the “Reading List” tab and what has been newly added is below.

Journals with issues dedicated to prison librarianship or PIC:

  • Library Trends  – Winter 2011 – Vol. 59 No. 3 – “Library and Information Services to Incarcerated Persons: Global Perspectives”
  • Radical Teacher – 2010 – No. 88 – “Teaching Against the Prison Industrial Complex”
  • Genre – Fall/Winter 2002 – Vol. 35 No. 3-4 – “Prisoners Writing” (is edited by Megan Sweeney)
  • Library Trends – Summer 1977 -Vol. 26 No. 1 – “Library Services to Correctional Facilities”
  • Library Association Pamphlet: Watson, Richard. Prison Libraries. London, 1951.

Urban Fiction: Part II – Resources On-line

As I try to explore Urban Fiction, I have found my self in multiple fits of frustration trying to find sources that I want… sources that are academic, critical, for librarians, or anything pertaining to Urban Lit. Recently I’ve came across some on-line sources that have proved very helpful in getting to where I want to be! Here are just a couple of excellent Urban Fiction Sources that are available on line:

WorldCat Genres: Urban Fiction

  • WorldCat has introduced an ‘experimental’ feature on their website that allows for an alternative method to browse library collections – this is their Genres section.
  • Here you can explore: authors, books, movies, subjects, places, and a teen section (there is a list dedicated to Urban Fiction and teens).
  • FYI: If you are not familiar with WorldCat, one of the coolest features is that once you are looking at an items’ page you can see where the closest book is to you by entering your zip code!
  • At first I thought that there were only ten books featured on this site, but there is 550+! In case you are also confused on how to explore this longer list, you can find it under their “Books” section through “Explore More Books.” [**See image  immediately below.**]

Urban Fiction/Street Lit/Hip Hop Fiction Resources for Librarians

  • In wiki style, this site provides booklists, social media, review & discussion sites, bestseller lists, articles, other wikis, power-points, pod-casts, and more.
  • One could spend hours exploring links on this site… and the links on those subsequent pages.
  • You can join the community of librarians to improve the site by adding information / links that will serve the community looking for Urban Lit resources.

Street Fiction

  • Holy Smokes! This site blows me away… I can’t believe it took me this long to stumble upon it!
  • Not only does this site feature Street Fiction, but sub-genres that are not frequently highlighted: Urban Nonfiction, Urban Christian Fiction, and Teen Urban Fiction. The majority of what is offered for each of these are reviews and purchase.
  • An additional unique feature is their section for LIBRARIANS (!!) that includes articles, booklists, books on Urban Fiction, history of Urban Fiction, and more.
  • One can also browse by author, place, and topic.

Street Lit Collection Development Resources