Successful Book Donation to Vandalia Correctional Center Library (& I Met My First Paid Prison Librarian!)

Last month the 3 R’s Project (Reading Reduces Recidivism) was able to make a successful donation to Vandalia Correctional Center Library!

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Vandalia’s librarian, Steve, was able to travel to a collection site to pick out collected items to bring back to the correctional library. He picked out 135 books (61 non-fiction, the rest fiction) and 20 magazines. Fiction was mostly classics, science fiction, and popular fiction (ex: Patterson). What Steve was unable to bring back to the library with him was urban fiction (a highly requested genre) due to the hardship in being able to collection urban fiction in the community.

Being able to meet a PIC librarian was great! I could barely believe I had the chance to ask any question that I wanted to someone working in a PIC library! Steve was able to share examples of key issues in the library he maintains, circulation periods, collection development & weeding, and offer feedback on some of the issues I was struggling with. Meeting Steve provided confirmation that I was on the right path on preparing for and thinking about PIC librarianship and gave me that boost that was all sometimes need to work on our work a little harder. 🙂

Back into the Swing of Things

I have been missing in action for the last couple weeks due to hoping in the car to make a quick trip back home to visit relatives that came for a visit from the other side of the states. This is were I met other librarians in my family and what a blast we had! (Photo above – librarians in green!)

This summer has been busy to say the least… I met my first paid prison librarian for the first time, created a bibliography on prison librarianship, am knee deep on a collection development project that includes tracking the lifespan of books in a correctional library, proposed a book club for the local jails, wrote a final paper that was proposal for a re-entry program at a public library, and today I’m prepping to organize and correctly label a collection of books with an other volunteer so we can be super effective when we are in the library this week.

It is now time to get back into the swing of academia and I am exploring bibliographic metadata (the fancy way of saying cataloging) and network systems.

I’ll try to post once a week, but with heaviness of course loads some weeks may be skipped.

Glennor Shirley’s Blog Is Down

UPDATE: As of July 26, 2012, Glennor Shirley’s blog is up and running again!

Glennor Shirley’s blog was considered one of the top prison library blogs.

Her blog, Prison Librarian, was located at http://www.prisonlibrarian.blogspot.com.

Last week she lost all of her blog content and I’m not sure if she is trying to regain her content.

The blog OLOS Columns: ALA’s Office for Literacy and Outreach Services featured Glennor as a guest blogger until 2008. You can read her past blog posts under the tag Services to Incarcerated People and Ex-Offenders.

To read more about Glennor Shirley, read Words from Past Prison Librarians: Glennor Shirley.

Words from Past Prison Librarians: Brenda Vogel

Here we continue our journey on looking into the perspectives of retired prison librarians. We previously looked at Frances Saniford and  Glennor Shirley. Our final retired librarian we will look at is Brenda Vogel.

Brenda Vogel, famous in the prison library world for Down for the Count: A Prison Library Handbook and The Prison Library Primer: A Program for the Twenty-First Century, was the coordinator of Maryland Correctional Education Libraries for 26 years.

Vogel calls the prison library “[a] curious mismatch, a triumph of good over evil, when it works” (xiii).

In “A Retired Prison Librarian’s Dream,” Vogel tells us that she still dreams about prison libraries, [l]ike a cigarette smoker who quits, not because you want to but because it’s time, you never get it out of your head” (xi).

In this piece, I like Vogel’s perspective on highly stolen books, partly because most of the dialogue is either to not stock the highly thefted books anymore or that it happens, so get over it:

Did you ever think of buying multiple copies of them so reading them wouldn’t be exclusive? So their value in the ‘marketplace’ would go down? [….] What if you had a procedure that would keep books from being stolen – like random shake-down of patrons by a CO as they left the library? The officer can check to see if the book is date-stamped. (xii)

Vogel offers a piece of advise before readers move from her retired librarians’ dream into her book, The Prison Library Primer:

And it only works under the heroic leadership of a librarian who is passionate, imaginative, cunning, conniving, creative, and convincing, a librarian who knows the course and stays the course and who keeps the library true to form in sight of the madness, corruption, and cynicism of the environment. (xiii)

Source:

Vogel, Brenda. The Prison Library Primer: A Program for the Twenty-First Century. Lanham: Scarecrow Press, 2009.

  • You can find a large portion of this book on Google Books.

Words from Past Prison Librarians: Glennor Shirley

Here we continue our journey on looking into the perspectives of retired prison librarians. We previous looked at Frances Saniford and now we move to Glennor Shirley.

Shirley retired in September 2011 after being a  prison librarian in Maryland for over 20 years. She has a popular blog that she still writes for called Prison Librarian.

After coming to Maryland from Jamaica in 1980, where she was also a librarian, Shirley began her work in the prison library as a part-time night job to make ends meet; this job eventually turned into her career, which she considers a “happy accident” (Haldeman). She states , “I am basically a person who believes in justice and what is right. I saw these needs behind bars” (Rosenwald “Glennor”).

Shirley claims “that her time as a prison librarian has been the most rewarding portion of her career” (Haldeman).

Why should non-imprisoned support prison libraries and reading behind bars? Shirley was not foreign to this question: “She was often asked why taxpayer money should be used to make a prisoner’s life more rewarding. Her standard answer: She wants to help them become taxpayers again. Without an education, she’d say, that’s impossible” (Rosenwald “Maryland’s”).

A card from one of her patrons from the day Shirley retired:

With deepest thanks and gratitude on your retirement from decades of advocacy on behalf of tens of thousands of Maryland prisoners. We will forever miss your enthusiasm of library services and especially your gorgeous smile. (Rosenwald “Maryland’s”)

Sources:

Haldeman, Annette, ed. “Glennor Shirley Retires.” The Crab: A Quarterly Publication of the Maryland Library Association. 42.2 (Winter 2012). 23-4.

  • If you follow the link to find a list of her writing on page 24.

Rosenwald, Michael. “Glennor Shirley, head librarian for Md. prisons, believes in books behind bars.” Washington Post 25 May 2011.

  • If you follow this link, you can also watch a video of Shirley speak.

Rosenwald, Michael. “Maryland’s beloved prison librarian retires.” Washington Post 9 Sept. 2011.