Increased Access to the Law Library: 1 of many demands from the 29,000+ CA inmates on hunger strike

While solitary confinement is the focus of California’s hunger strike by inmates, access to the law library is among other demands:

law library demands

The list of demands can be seen on the LA Times website here. Read about the hunger strike in the LA Times’ article 29,000 California Prison Inmates Refuse Meals in 2nd Day of Protest.

Youth imprisoned at Green Hill prison are joining the hunger strike with their own demands. You can view their full list of demands here. Below are a few library specific demands:

3. EDUCATION: Provide relevant and specialized educational programs to all residents even after they have graduated from High School. These could include cosmetology, music/multimedia production, library access, law training, culinary arts, and more. There are plenty of rooms that are currently not being used for anything but storage. They should be used.

4. LEGAL ACCESS: Access to updated legal material, updated each year. This should include: A well-stocked law library in the school available to all, updated regularly. Books and resources available at anytime. Access to internet sites with relevant legal material available at all times. Access to resources detailing available legal counsel. Copies of JRA/DOC employee policy handbooks in every single wing for residents to read. These must be updated each year.

10. FREEDOM OF SPEECH: The 1st amendment must be respected in JRA/DOC facilities. We have a right to speak our mind and express ourselves with whatever language we choose as long it does not threaten others. We must also be free to organize without punishment.

If you are interested in following the hunger strike, here are two specific blogs to the strike:

http://prisonstrike.wordpress.com/

http://prisonerhungerstrikesolidarity.wordpress.com/

Advertisements

Resources for Aspiring Prison Librarians

Today I came across two great resources made by and for Library and Information Science students who might be interested in perusing a career in prison librarianship. Here they are!

  1. Prison Libraries: An Annotated Bibliography
    • by Sharon Bailey, Kim Parry,  and Emily Thompson
    • Oct. 24, 2011
    • This annotation provides an overview and sections on prison library services and programming, access to information and the digital divide, collection development, and their own search strategies.
  2. Books Behind Bars: Is Correctional Librarianship a Job for You? – A pathfinder for librarians and library science students interested in exploring library services to the incarcerated as a profession
    • by Justine Johnson
    • December 2009
    • This pathfinder’s intention is on the historical and current placement of LIS and the connection between the PIC and libraries as institutions. It offers sections on general sources, history of correctional library services, correctional library programing, profiles of correctional librarians, juvenile populations, and professional resources.